Harry N. Pillsbury’s final correspondence to ACB

Pillsbury’s end was sad and prolonged… ChessBase has a good article on him which I will briefly quote as they do a good job outlining the facts of his end: Disease and madness In April/May 1904 Pillsbury played his last big tournament, in Cambridge-Springs. Though he managed to beat Lasker he finished only ninth. Marshall…

Geza Maroczy consultation game at Manhattan Chess Club (Feb 1906)

Geza Maroczy’s Visit to America   The best introduction is the contemporaneous one… The consultation game at Manhattan Chess Club, scheduled on the fly to replace the intended Maroczy–Fox exhibition game when Fox couldn’t make it that night, has a lush photograph of all the participants and official (left to right):  H.M. Phillips, G.H. Koehler,…

Otto Roething – trapeze artist?

  From <CG> we have yet another interesting find by <MissScarlett> (often endearingly referred to by me as <Missy>, albeit with a slight touch of mockery): Mar-02-18 MissScarlett: From his <BDE> obituary notice, of August 15th 1915, Sect.V p.3:<He was of quiet demeanor and generally well liked. Before coming to this country, he was an expert on…

Réti – Murderous robber?! Ce n’est pas possible!

A rather interesting and indepth interview with Réti from a 1924 Czech newspaper reveals not just one unfortunate brush with the law, but two encounters – both of which sound rather unpleasant, especially considering that he was detained for intensive interrogation for both murder and robbery in one: Interview with MS. (Czech?) master of chess.…

Réti’s thoughts/comments on Charousek

    Let us begin with the somewhat mistitled chapter “17. Americanism in Chess“, from Réti’s book “Modern Ideas in Chess” (1923), where the focus is much more on the Czech-born Hungarian Charousek rather than the Somerville-born American Pillsbury: 17. Americanism in Chess The difference between European and American intellectual life had to find itself…